How can i find someone/x27s cell number

How to Find Someone's Phone Number Online

Swap business cards. Method 3. Walk away smoothly. Instead, walk away calmly and either leave the scene or hang out in a different area. Wait patiently. Wait at least 24 hours before making a move and giving them a call.

Although texting offers an emotional shield, it is distancing and impersonal. For a much more personal conversation, call them.

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This goes for the first or the fortieth time you get a hold of them; calling is almost always preferable to texting. This is just another person, right? Keep calm and collected and it will show, making you even that much more attractive to them. Method 4. Take their phone.

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If you are with the person, try taking their phone. You could do this secretly and hide it, or be open and flirty about it. Send yourself a text message from their phone, and add your contact to their list. Look up their number in their phone settings. Ask someone else for their number. If you have a mutual friend, simply ask them for the person's number instead. This way, you get the number without having to be so up-front about it. Look it up in a directory. If you have a phone book, school directory, or archive of coworker phone numbers, look up their number.

Use whatever method you have available to find their number. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Already answered Not a question Bad question Other. Tips Don't try to be too obvious about the fact that you are trying to hold a conversation with someone just so you can get your number.

Don't keep begging the person for their number. Be mindful of your relationship with the person whose number you are trying to obtain.

A cell phone number lookup has never been easy, but these tips help

Rushing some of these steps with a person you hardly know will make them uncomfortable. If you are given a fake number, don't take it too personally. That person wasn't right for you anyway! Related wikiHows.

Did this summary help you? Yes No. Did this article help you? Cookies make wikiHow better. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. About This Article. Co-authors: Updated: May 1, In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 's, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma.

Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period. They say that low-fat weight-loss diets have proved in clinical trials and real life to be dismal failures, and that on top of it all, the percentage of fat in the American diet has been decreasing for two decades.

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Tracking a cell phone number could be just a few clicks away. You can look up a cell phone number or search for someone's phone number. Ever thought of finding an unknown person's phone number by knowing his name? See here are few methods which help you to search for.

Our cholesterol levels have been declining, and we have been smoking less, and yet the incidence of heart disease has not declined as would be expected. The science behind the alternative hypothesis can be called Endocrinology , which is how it's referred to by David Ludwig, a researcher at Harvard Medical School who runs the pediatric obesity clinic at Children's Hospital Boston, and who prescribes his own version of a carbohydrate-restricted diet to his patients.

Endocrinology requires an understanding of how carbohydrates affect insulin and blood sugar and in turn fat metabolism and appetite. This is basic endocrinology, Ludwig says, which is the study of hormones, and it is still considered radical because the low-fat dietary wisdom emerged in the 's from researchers almost exclusively concerned with the effect of fat on cholesterol and heart disease. At the time, Endocrinology was still underdeveloped, and so it was ignored.

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Now that this science is becoming clear, it has to fight a quarter century of anti-fat prejudice. The alternative hypothesis also comes with an implication that is worth considering for a moment, because it's a whopper, and it may indeed be an obstacle to its acceptance. If the alternative hypothesis is right -- still a big ''if'' -- then it strongly suggests that the ongoing epidemic of obesity in America and elsewhere is not, as we are constantly told, due simply to a collective lack of will power and a failure to exercise.

Rather it occurred, as Atkins has been saying along with Barry Sears, author of ''The Zone'' , because the public health authorities told us unwittingly, but with the best of intentions, to eat precisely those foods that would make us fat, and we did. We ate more fat-free carbohydrates, which, in turn, made us hungrier and then heavier. Put simply, if the alternative hypothesis is right, then a low-fat diet is not by definition a healthy diet.

In practice, such a diet cannot help being high in carbohydrates, and that can lead to obesity, and perhaps even heart disease.

Scientists are still arguing about fat, despite a century of research, because the regulation of appetite and weight in the human body happens to be almost inconceivably complex, and the experimental tools we have to study it are still remarkably inadequate. This combination leaves researchers in an awkward position. To study the entire physiological system involves feeding real food to real human subjects for months or years on end, which is prohibitively expensive, ethically questionable if you're trying to measure the effects of foods that might cause heart disease and virtually impossible to do in any kind of rigorously controlled scientific manner.

But if researchers seek to study something less costly and more controllable, they end up studying experimental situations so oversimplified that their results may have nothing to do with reality. This then leads to a research literature so vast that it's possible to find at least some published research to support virtually any theory.

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The result is a balkanized community -- ''splintered, very opinionated and in many instances, intransigent,'' says Kurt Isselbacher, a former chairman of the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Science -- in which researchers seem easily convinced that their preconceived notions are correct and thoroughly uninterested in testing any other hypotheses but their own. What's more, the number of misconceptions propagated about the most basic research can be staggering. Researchers will be suitably scientific describing the limitations of their own experiments, and then will cite something as gospel truth because they read it in a magazine.

The classic example is the statement heard repeatedly that 95 percent of all dieters never lose weight, and 95 percent of those who do will not keep it off. This will be correctly attributed to the University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist Albert Stunkard, but it will go unmentioned that this statement is based on patients who passed through Stunkard's obesity clinic during the Eisenhower administration. With these caveats, one of the few reasonably reliable facts about the obesity epidemic is that it started around the early 's. According to Katherine Flegal, an epidemiologist at the National Center for Health Statistics, the percentage of obese Americans stayed relatively constant through the 's and 's at 13 percent to 14 percent and then shot up by 8 percentage points in the 's.

By the end of that decade, nearly one in four Americans was obese. That steep rise, which is consistent through all segments of American society and which continued unabated through the 's, is the singular feature of the epidemic.

How do you find a person's name by their cell phone number?

Any theory that tries to explain obesity in America has to account for that. Meanwhile, overweight children nearly tripled in number.

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And for the first time, physicians began diagnosing Type 2 diabetes in adolescents. Type 2 diabetes often accompanies obesity. It used to be called adult-onset diabetes and now, for the obvious reason, is not. So how did this happen? The orthodox and ubiquitous explanation is that we live in what Kelly Brownell, a Yale psychologist, has called a ''toxic food environment'' of cheap fatty food, large portions, pervasive food advertising and sedentary lives.

And because these foods, especially fast food, are so filled with fat, they are both irresistible and uniquely fattening. On top of this, so the theory goes, our modern society has successfully eliminated physical activity from our daily lives. We no longer exercise or walk up stairs, nor do our children bike to school or play outside, because they would prefer to play video games and watch television.

And because some of us are obviously predisposed to gain weight while others are not, this explanation also has a genetic component -- the thrifty gene.

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It suggests that storing extra calories as fat was an evolutionary advantage to our Paleolithic ancestors, who had to survive frequent famine. We then inherited these ''thrifty'' genes, despite their liability in today's toxic environment. This theory makes perfect sense and plays to our puritanical prejudice that fat, fast food and television are innately damaging to our humanity.

But there are two catches. First, to buy this logic is to accept that the copious negative reinforcement that accompanies obesity -- both socially and physically -- is easily overcome by the constant bombardment of food advertising and the lure of a supersize bargain meal. And second, as Flegal points out, little data exist to support any of this. Certainly none of it explains what changed so significantly to start the epidemic. Fast-food consumption, for example, continued to grow steadily through the 70's and 80's, but it did not take a sudden leap, as obesity did.

As far as exercise and physical activity go, there are no reliable data before the mid's, according to William Dietz, who runs the division of nutrition and physical activity at the Centers for Disease Control; the 's data show obesity rates continuing to climb, while exercise activity remained unchanged. This suggests the two have little in common. Dietz also acknowledged that a culture of physical exercise began in the United States in the 70's -- the ''leisure exercise mania,'' as Robert Levy, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, described it in -- and has continued through the present day.

As for the thrifty gene, it provides the kind of evolutionary rationale for human behavior that scientists find comforting but that simply cannot be tested. In other words, if we were living through an anorexia epidemic, the experts would be discussing the equally untestable ''spendthrift gene'' theory, touting evolutionary advantages of losing weight effortlessly. An overweight homo erectus, they'd say, would have been easy prey for predators. It is also undeniable, note students of Endocrinology , that mankind never evolved to eat a diet high in starches or sugars.

What's forgotten in the current controversy is that the low-fat dogma itself is only about 25 years old. Until the late 70's, the accepted wisdom was that fat and protein protected against overeating by making you sated, and that carbohydrates made you fat. In ''The Physiology of Taste,'' for instance, an discourse considered among the most famous books ever written about food, the French gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin says that he could easily identify the causes of obesity after 30 years of listening to one ''stout party'' after another proclaiming the joys of bread, rice and from a ''particularly stout party'' potatoes.

Brillat-Savarin described the roots of obesity as a natural predisposition conjuncted with the ''floury and feculent substances which man makes the prime ingredients of his daily nourishment. This is what my mother taught me 40 years ago, backed up by the vague observation that Italians tended toward corpulence because they ate so much pasta. This observation was actually documented by Ancel Keys, a University of Minnesota physician who noted that fats ''have good staying power,'' by which he meant they are slow to be digested and so lead to satiation, and that Italians were among the heaviest populations he had studied.